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TOPIC: Many Tops & Plants That I Buy - This topic is educational

Re:New Tops & Plants Ready for 2013 Season 4 years 7 months ago #22460

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Your welcome Hillhopper

Hillhopper wrote:

Thanks for the info Billy. I haven't ever dug enough Bloodroot to try and sell but I'll probably try my hand at it soon. If I can get it dug, Ill give you a call. I was wanting to talk to you about something concerning dried Ginseng anyhow. I will shoot you an email or call you before long.

Hillhopper

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Re:New Tops & Plants Ready for 2013 Season 4 years 7 months ago #22463

Speaking of Bloodrooot, I was out checking one of my mushroom spots yesterday. This woods once had 3 separate very old and thick patches of bloodroot. Each of the 3 patches were approximately 20 foot x 20 foot per patch. The roots were as thick as a large carrot and so big they actually were partially exposed on the soil surface underneath the canopy of mature bloodroot plants that stood a good 24'' tall.

I have been admiring those plants since I discovered them about 5 years ago. Even took some seed off of them and planted them in a different woods.

Unfortunately, someone dug it last fall. There is not one plant left. I mean no trace that there was ever bloodroot there. I know most everyone around that hunts, fishes etc and I do not know of any root diggers around my parts. But there is obviously one around. The digger was thorough in his digging apparently and left no smaller ones behind. Very sad to see. I hope diggers use good stewardship like we all do with ginseng when it comes to other woodland plants. I mean if this digger could have left even a half dozen plants or so behind that patch would eventually grow back over the years.

The thing about bloodroot is this. When the seeds fall off and lay under a mature patch of bloodroot they typically do not survive. The big mature plants have a foothold already and there is a maze of roots and the seeds have no where to grow.

It is sad that these three patches are gone forever now. I hope anyone reading this post uses good stewardship when digging bloodroot like you and your friends do Billy. You always do such a nice job reminding people to use good stewardship and I really appreciate that.

Thanks,
Latt

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Re:New Tops & Plants Ready for 2013 Season 4 years 7 months ago #22464

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Thanks Latt

It is most definatly something that all diggers must be aware of.One should never ever dig the small plants out of a patch of any thing that he choses to harvest.It is unwise and in my opinion it greives even the creator to see sutch greed in a person.A scripture comes to mind when we think of the importance of allowing all that we dig and harvest to reproduce by using good judgment and this is it.

Gen_1:29 And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat.

You see here in this verse how that the Bible said ( I have given you every herb bearing seed ) That tells me that God wanted even the very first humans to realise that a herb has a seed within its self and that seed causes the reproduction of that giving plant.The herb is to benifit the man for either food or medicine and any man that would like to eat or be healed should use wisdom and basic knowldge and remember to leave the seed.

Well said my friend I to always enjoy your comments and the council you gave is very good today Latt.I am sad that someone destroyed that beautiful old patch and I myself have never saw roots of that caliber the size of carrots.I could never have dug that patch dry and would have left many small plants and some of the big ones as well.I am always proud of the members of this site for exspressing the importance of leaving seed for the future there are many great people on this site.That is what keeps me coming back here and sharing my exsperience and kowldge it is people like you.

People please never dig every root always leave seed behind.You can harvest a patch like Latt has told us about and make a good profit and still leave behind seed for future generations.

Billy.

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Re:New Tops & Plants Ready for 2013 Season 4 years 7 months ago #22465

Billy,

Do you buy Mayapple root as well? Always seems to be a lot of it around.

Thanks,

mhowa

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Re:New Tops & Plants Ready for 2013 Season 4 years 7 months ago #22466

Thanks Billy for the kind words as well as your words of wisdom. I have dug a few bloodroot in my day and have transplanted them into my perennial beds and here and there over the years. They typically are the thickness of my little finger and up to 4 or 5 inched long in some cases. However, I have never seen patches in all my years like these 3 patches were. The roots were as thick as my thumb and some were as long as 6 to 8 inches. I have no idea how old they were but they were definitely old.
Thanks,
Latt

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Re:New Tops & Plants Ready for 2013 Season 4 years 7 months ago #22467

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mhowa yes I do buy may apple alot of it e-mail me or call me any time for a price guide oneway3862yahoo.com


Latt your welcome.

Billy.

mhowa wrote:

Billy,

Do you buy Mayapple root as well? Always seems to be a lot of it around.

Thanks,

mhowa

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Re:New Tops & Plants Ready for 2013 Season 4 years 7 months ago #22468

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May Apple/American Mandrake The resin of May Apple is obtained from the root,and is used in the treatment of warts.The root and plant contain valuable constituents Quercetin, Kaempferol, Podophyllin, Isorhamnetin, Gallic-acid, Berberine, Alpha-peltatin, that are being studied for their healing, anticancer and other properties. The root is used as a medicinal herb, it is antibilious, cathartic, cytostatic, hydrogogue and purgative, it should only be used by professional Herbalists.



My personal observatin concerning this plant

May Apple is plentyful nearly any where I look and is very easy reconised.It is for sure better to dry this root before selling it as it is not very profitabe if you sell it wet.A good digger after drying this root could exspect to earn $40.00 to $60.00 a day on a good harvest of May Apple

Billy.
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Re:New Tops & Plants Ready for 2013 Season 4 years 7 months ago #22469

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Slippery Elm Inner Tree Bark - the inner bark has important medicinal value and is an official drug of the United States Pharmacopeia. Medicnes made from elm bark help with Sore throat,Cough,Mild respiratory ailments,Gastritis, peptic ulcer, and other gastrointestinal conditions,Diarrhea,Wounds, burns, boils, and other skin conditions.



My personal observatin concerning this Tree Bark

Slippery Elm is a very good bark and it is fairly easy to harvest compared to many other barks.Once the outter bark is split you can take ahold of the bark and pull long strips of inner and outter bark off of the tree together.Then you peel the outter bark from the inner bark.It may sound diffucult but actualy it is a easy bark to harvest.A good puller can earn from $75.00 to $175.00 a day pulling bark according to the size of the tree and the exsperience of the puller.

-NOTE- in some areas the tree can not be pulled check with your local game wardens.Also in some areas where the tree can not be pulled,you can pull them on private land with the owners consent or you can obtain permission to pull the trees if a land owner is clear cutting the timber.The tree is not good for building,fire wood,etc it is actualy best used for medicine and because of this the Loggers or the Miners will gladly let you have the trees if you get in front of them in most cases.I have only detailed the rules for this tree in my surrounding area,be sure to check with your local officials.

Billy.
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Re:New Tops & Plants Ready for 2013 Season 4 years 7 months ago #22499

Pictures are really nice & appreciated, it will help me to identify the different herbs. and to learn more of their use. Looking forward to more of your post & pictures, I am trying to learn & identify wild herbs,
DeeBee

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Re:New Tops & Plants Ready for 2013 Season 4 years 7 months ago #22512

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Deebee your welcome


DeeBee wrote:

Pictures are really nice & appreciated, it will help me to identify the different herbs. and to learn more of their use. Looking forward to more of your post & pictures, I am trying to learn & identify wild herbs,
DeeBee

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