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TOPIC: Geography ratings

Geography ratings 3 years 10 months ago #27244

I was wondering about folk's opinions as to where was the best growing geographical location in the USA.

Some say it's east appalacians, some say it's west appalacians. Then there's enormous roots posted on this website that come out of NY.

Please post you opinions here... I think or forum members would be interested!

Me: I have heard the NC escarpment is one of the best regions to grow.

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Re:Geography ratings 3 years 10 months ago #27246

Ray,

While Vermont and New York Ginseng is highly sought after and some huge old roots grow in both states, there are many areas of the Appalachians as well as Westward that also produce quality large roots. Maybe our' Tennessee Ginseng roots may not be considered as great (quality-wise) as roots from these afore-mentioned states, our's has and still can grow to massive sizes. As I had noted several times on here, when I was younger, I dug an 8 prong with a root that would not fit down in a regular old-time bushel basket. It was that massive and to try to stuff it into a bushel basket, would have damaged the root fibers as well as the four main roots coming off of the stem.

Now, IMHO, the best place to grow large and heavy Ginseng, would be a very fertile and wooded river bottom. There is some huge Ginseng (plants and roots) that grows in the river bottoms along the Tennessee River (not going to give a location) but the only problem is, that the soil is mainly sediment and silt over red clay. While the soil contains everything that Ginseng needs and more to grow huge, the soil turns the roots red and thus are not sellable. I believe that if planted in fertile black mountain soil and with enough time, the roots will eventually lose the red and be highly prized roots! If you had a river bottom that was loaded with fertile black soils, then that is where you can grow some really big and quality Ginseng. I hope to one day, dig some of the massive plants and roots along the Tennessee River and transplant them into black mountain soil.


Frank

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Re:Geography ratings 3 years 10 months ago #27247

Huntsman, interesting for sure. I have never had any luck digging or finding seng growing in lower areas where the river floods during a heavy rain. Seems like any low lying land in my areas does not produce seng as you are mentioning.

I have seen the black fertile sandy and loamy soils along the rivers that you speak of and often wished to find large seng or any seng with no luck. Even in large valleys that have have large streams and creeks are void of seng down low where the water rises at times.

Not doubting your finds at all. Just wish it happened around here.

Would love to see picks of some of that large Tenessee river seng tho.
Sounds like it's some pretty big stuff. Would love to have some fresh ones for my seed bed if you ever have a chance to dig some. Would be happy to buy them if we could figure how to do so without breaking any laws.
Thanks,
Latt

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Re:Geography ratings 3 years 10 months ago #27248

so, to do a carry-forward log;

NC Mountains eastern downslopes,
Boone to Sylva
Vermont
NY
Tennisee

Might be nice to get some regional locations [NOT the exact place!!!] within the listed states.

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Re:Geography ratings 3 years 10 months ago #27251

Hello, I am a new member and new at raising seng. You made mention of your seed beds, how long do you keep in seed beds before planting?

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Re:Geography ratings 3 years 10 months ago #27262

Welcome to the forum, Farmgirl.

There are sections to the forum, of various interests. Such as \"Growing\" and \" General Questions\" and several other sections. I invite you to look over the forum, and use the search bar to get some of your questions answered. If you type in your question, there will likely be a response to show up using that.

Beyond that, you can contribute to any thread as a part of the thread's subject any time you want. Each thread is somewhat compartmentalized, and the posts made to it are focused on that thread's subject.

Again, welcome to the forum, and We look forward to your future posts.

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Re:Geography ratings 3 years 10 months ago #27278

Latt wrote:

Huntsman, interesting for sure. I have never had any luck digging or finding seng growing in lower areas where the river floods during a heavy rain. Seems like any low lying land in my areas does not produce seng as you are mentioning.

I have seen the black fertile sandy and loamy soils along the rivers that you speak of and often wished to find large seng or any seng with no luck. Even in large valleys that have have large streams and creeks are void of seng down low where the water rises at times.

Not doubting your finds at all. Just wish it happened around here.

Would love to see picks of some of that large Tenessee river seng tho.
Sounds like it's some pretty big stuff. Would love to have some fresh ones for my seed bed if you ever have a chance to dig some. Would be happy to buy them if we could figure how to do so without breaking any laws.
Thanks,
Latt


Latt,

I should have been more definitive in my posting when it came to Ginseng growing in river bottoms! The areas that I know where this big and heavy Ginseng grows, is not in the normal high water or even the 10 or 20 year Flood Plain. These aforementioned areas can and will do more harm to Ginseng if the water covers it too long. This Ginseng grows in what would be consider the 100 to even 500 year Flood Plains. These areas have had river deposits (i.e. sediments, top soils, nutrients, etc.) deposited in these locations about every 100 years out to every 500 years over not thousands but over millions of years. The only problem as previously mentioned is the red clay which is the primary base of soil in these areas which does not have enough sediments and top soils left over from floods to create enough of a dark soil base over the clay. While the soil in these areas receive super infusions of nutrients during these historic floods which promotes astounding growth in Ginseng, it is still primarily red clay which tints the roots red and makes them undesirable for the Ginseng market.

You may have noticed a similar situation in bottoms along creeks and larger streams that do not flood significantly or too often and the water does not cover any Ginseng growing in these locations for very long. I know I have and you may have found some of the biggest Ginseng plants and roots in these types of areas. It is similar to bigger river bottoms but on a smaller scale!

As far as finding Ginseng in lower elevation areas. I have found lots of Ginseng, some of it very big, in some of the lowest elevation areas in my area. I have not only found and dug Ginseng growing on small hillsides and ridge sides above lakes and rivers with Ginseng growing right down to the high water line but I have also found and dug Ginseng growing on wooded lots in subdivisions right inside the city limits of Knoxville, Tennessee as well as the outskirts of the city. IMHO, if the soil and sunshine conditions are right, I believe that Ginseng can grow anywhere from 5,000 feet of more above sea level down to hundreds if not thousands of feet below sea level as I do not believe it to be severely effected by elevation. Cold and/or heat (temperature range), cold winds, lack of appropriate sunshine, soil conditions and nutrients, yes but not elevation.


Frank

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Re:Geography ratings 3 years 10 months ago #27310

:) yes i was wondering also at what elevation do most hunters have luck at diggin ginseng at like in w va

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Re:Geography ratings 3 years 10 months ago #27314

hitrun wrote:

:) yes i was wondering also at what elevation do most hunters have luck at diggin ginseng at like in w va


hitrun,

First off, welcome to the Wildgrown forums! I hope you will stay with us and share some pics and stories of some Ginseng hunts!

As most folks in West Virginia that travel around and dig Ginseng will tell you, it grows at about most elevations from the hills and ridges along many Rivers, larger streams and lakes to much of the higher ridges and mountains. You won't find anything at the highest slopes such as where Snowshoe Ski Lodge is located or on the top of Spruce Knob which is the highest mountain (at a little over 4,860 feet) in West Virginia. However, from at least 4,000 feet down to the hills and ridges in the lowest elevations, Ginseng will grow and thrive. If I had to put any actual numbers on the elevations where the most Ginseng grows in West Virginia, I would say that between 1,500 feet and 3,000 feet in elevation would be the best but I have dug it below and above those elevations. Just find the biggest and hardest mountain to climb with little if any access, be willing to work your way all the way to the top and down the other side of the mountain and you may find a lot of really big and old Ginseng. If you decide to take such an adventure, pack extra supplies as you may be out for a couple of days or more, take a GPS or Compass, pack something for security against whatever threat you might run into and wear Snake Chaps/Gaiters and if possible, Snake protection for your' arms as well. Black Mountain Rattlesnakes get really big in West Virginia.


Frank

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